A study from Scotland found that losing weight over one year resulted in a normalization of glucose levels in some of the study participants.

Get type 2 diabetes in remission

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I know that I address the subject of type 2 diabetes quite often but that is because there are so many Americans who have type 2 diabetes. Another 86 million with pre-diabetes are headed that way. Any tip that can help lower diabetes risk or reverse pre-diabetes is great. 

A study from Scotland found that losing weight over one year resulted in a normalization of glucose levels in some of the study participants. Here is more.

In this 12-month study of 306 adults with type 2 diabetes, the ages ranged from 20 to 65. These participants had diabetes for a maximum of six years.

Weight loss over the year of the study brought about changes in diabetes control:

  • When there was no weight loss, there was no remission of type 2 diabetes.
  • A 22-32 pound weight loss resulted in 57 percent of these folks going into diabetes remission.
  • A 33 pound (or more) weight loss resulted in 86 percent of those folks going into remission. WOW!!

What did the researchers define as remission?

  • A1C going below 6.5 percent                              
  • Getting off and staying off diabetes medications
  • Maintaining the lower A1C and avoidance of anti-diabetes meds for at least two months

This is very promising research because it helps us understand that body weight has an impact on type 2 diabetes management. The more weight that you lose, the better the glucose control – in fact, so good that medications can be stopped completely.

What this study does not show is for how long diabetes can be managed through lifestyle when folks are leaner. Will the diabetes progress at the same rate as for those on meds? There are many areas still to be researched but this is a good reminder that losing weight may benefit your diabetes so well that you can stop diabetes medications. And the more weight loss, the better. The key will be keeping it off for the long haul.

Recipes to try:

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About the Author

Rita Smith is a Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator. She's been working in the field of nutrition and disease prevention for more than 35 years and currently works at Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital in Charlottesville, Va. Each week, Rita provides nutrition counseling to clients who have a variety of disorders or diseases including high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, gastroparesis and weight management. For these clients, food choices can help them manage their health problems.