This conference provides a unique opportunity for local clinicians to learn about this highly specialized, or quaternary, procedure and meet the pioneer of the surgery technique in one of its featured speakers, Dr. Paul Sugarbaker.

Sentara Cancer Network, EVMS present conference

Hipec Cancer Surgery

When cancer has spread, or is especially difficult to treat, many patients and loved ones struggle for hope. That’s why physicians in the Sentara Cancer Network are excited to offer a procedure called HIPEC, which stands for heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

Showing great medical promise with HIPEC has led the Sentara Cancer Network and Eastern Virginia Medical School to present the Mid-Atlantic Peritoneal Malignancy Conference at the Virginia Beach Hilton on June 11 and 12.

This conference provides a unique opportunity for local clinicians to learn about this highly specialized, or quaternary, procedure and meet the pioneer of the surgery technique in one of its featured speakers, Dr. Paul Sugarbaker.

In simple terms, HIPEC is a specialized procedure for cancers that have spread throughout the abdomen. Once tumors are surgically removed, the abdomen cavity is washed in a heated chemotherapy solution. This is meant to treat any cells that have potentially been left behind after surgery.

There are fewer than 60 HIPEC programs in the United States, and two of them are located here in the Sentara Cancer Network in Hampton Roads. With such extensive experience performing the HIPEC procedure, surgeons at Sentara have seen how this valuable tool aids in the fight against cancer and in preserving life as more patients reach the significant five-year mark.

The Sentara Cancer Network credits a multidisciplinary approach that a procedure like this requires – from OR to nursing floor and pharmacy, this procedure requires extreme collaboration among providers for patient-centered care.

The Sentara Cancer Network  is nationally accredited by the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer as an integrated network program. It was the first in Virginia to receive this designation, which requires measurable demonstration of the close collaboration among multiple facilities and specialties.